Saturday, 12 March 2011

Fingerpicking 12.3.11

In this lesson, the basics of fingerpicking are explained, some widely used fingerpicking patterns are covered and a list of more complex examples is given. For information on picking with a pick, one is referred to the picking section. Slap and pop right-hand techniques can be found in the slap & pop section.
The image below represents your picking hand. p stands for pulgar or thumb, i stands for indice or index finger, m for medio, a for anular or ring finger, and c for chico or little finger (see also http://goo.gl/xRILh). In all examples given below, these letters indicate which finger of your picking hand (be it left or right) should play the corresponding string indicated on the tablature.

Standard patterns
After I learned to play chords and some basic strumming, these were the three fingerpicking patterns I was taught: one for each common time signature. All patterns are written for the C chord, but they apply to any chord, only the bass note may have to be adapted. The rythm is very easy, they all have the same duration. Using a metronome might help here. Make sure you master these before moving on!

Alternatives
Here are some alternatives in 4/4 for the first standard pattern above. Again, play them evenly, both in time and volume!
And some alternatives in 3/4 and 2/4:

Polyphonic patterns
You get many more possibilities when including the playing of multiple strings at the same time. The examples below are just for your inspiration. After playing through these, you should easily come up with your own patterns. Anything is possible!
4/4 examples:
3/4 and 2/4 examples:
If repeating these patterns is starting to bore you, try learning some fingerpicking songs, and incorporate melody and bass lines into your playing! Have fun!

Additional material
5 Bart Rogiers: Fingerpicking In this lesson, the basics of fingerpicking are explained, some widely used fingerpicking patterns are covered and a list of more complex e...

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